Technology is useful, but drones alone won’t save Africa’s elephants

Technology has made a tremendous difference in the world, in areas as diverse as health and education, and pretty much everything in between.

Read more

Bangladesh’s Crop Scientists Find an Ally to Better Cope with Climate Change

Mymensingh, Bangladesh — Bangladesh, whose populous and low-level delta region is expected to be severely affected by rising sea levels, is using nuclear technology to adapt to this threat. Scientists are looking for ways to protect the country’s agriculture against flood and salinity, as well as drought and changing temperatures. With support from the IAEA and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), they are developing climate change resilient crop varieties that will help feed the country’s growing population.

Read more

EU sets ambitious targets for cleaner trucks

The European Institutions reached an agreement last night for the first time limiting CO2 emissions from trucks.

Read more

What happens to the natural world if all the insects disappear?

There are an awful lot of insects. It’s hard to say exactly how many because 80% haven’t yet been described by taxonomists, but there are probably about 5.5m species. Put that number together with other kinds of animals with exoskeletons and jointed legs, known collectively as arthropods – this includes mites, spiders and woodlice – and there are probably about 7m species in all.

Read more

“Train the Trainers” Workshop for Medical Physicists in Africa Emphasizes Need for Regional Collaboration

In a continent with a shortage of medical physicists and training facilities for them, regional cooperation in training is key for effective and safe cancer care. The IAEA held the first ever training workshop on how to establish clinical training programmes for radiotherapy medical physicists using regional cooperation in Abuja, Nigeria from 18 to 20 December 2018.

Read more

EU and IAEA Review Progress and Agree on Priorities in Nuclear Cooperation at Annual Meeting

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the European Union (EU) reviewed progress achieved in working together on a range of nuclear activities and agreed to further enhance cooperation during their seventh annual Senior Officials Meeting, in Luxembourg, this week.

Read more

Virus-infested fungus could help cut chemical pesticides

The evidence against chemical pesticides is mounting. An estimated 7m people are at risk from exposure to pesticides globally, while a million a year suffer or die from pesticide associated diseases. And that says nothing of the damage they are thought to be doing to other wildlife. Yet when humanity needs to produce approximately two billion tons of crops every year to feed itself and the population is still increasing, it’s difficult to see how we can grow the necessary food without pesticides.

Read more

Scientists fine-tune method to save rhinos

Only two northern white rhinos exist in the world: both are female and neither can bear calves. But scientists have not given up hope of saving the species from extinction.

Read more

Toward Closing the Gender Gap in Nuclear Science

Women make up less than a quarter of the workforce in the nuclear sector worldwide, hurting not only diversity within the industry, but also competitiveness, experts have said. Many organizations, including the IAEA, are actively working to increase the share of women in all job categories.

Read more

The Future of Tech: Building Quantum Technology With Ion Beam Accelerators

Novel quantum-based biosensors using diamond with nitrogen-vacancy centres are being developed through at 10-year project called Q-LEAP. These sensors could vastly improve the study of human brain functions, such as real-time detection of thoughts. (Image: Y. Yamazaki/National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, Japan)

Read more